Graduate Curricular Procedures and Forms

All graduate course add, change, and drop proposals must be submitted via the Course Submission and Consultation System (CSCS). CSCS can be accessed through the ANGEL Course Management System. Formal consultation should be requested and acknowledged via CSCS.

For program proposals, email correspondence is usually sufficient to request, receive, and address any feedback from the consultants. Comments, questions, and concerns must be addressed by the proposer. Changes, if necessary, should be made to the proposal and documented in the proposer's response to the consultant. Please note that, unlike undergraduate proposals, a graduate proposal cannot move forward until all of the formal consultants have responded.

Curricular Consultation and Suggested Consultation Guidelines

(excerpts from the Glossary section of the Senate Guide to Curricular Procedures)

Evidence of Consultation

Formal consultation should be requested and acknowledged in writing. For courses, this consultation should take place through the CSCS system. For program proposals, an email correspondence is usually sufficient to request, receive, and address any feedback from the consulted parties. Any concerns or suggestions made by the consulted party should be addressed by the proposer. This is not to say that the proposer must acquiesce to concerns or suggestions made by the consulted party. However, in the spirit of collegiality, an effort must be made to address those suggestions and concerns either through improved justification or changes to the proposal. Consultation correspondence (including the request, the reply, and any follow-up communication) should be included with the course proposal.

Course Changes - Suggested Consultation Guidelines

  • Consult all campuses/departments where that course has been taught in the last five years. Previous offerings of the course are provided by the CSCS.
  • Consult all departments or programs affected by a change of prerequisites in the proposed course. This includes all campuses where the course has also been taught.
  • If the change involves altering the course name such that overlap may occur with similarly named courses outside the proposed course’s disciplinary community, consult the affected departments or programs. For example, suppose a course is proposed with the word "Engineering" in the title that will be taught by a non-engineering department or program. The College of Engineering should be consulted. This is not to imply that programs have ownership of certain words. Rather, caution should be exercised (and consultation sought) when courses contain words or terms that lie outside the course's home disciplinary community.
  • If the course change involves altering the content of the course such that there is risk of significant content duplication with another course, the affected department or program should be consulted.
  • Consult any department or program that requires or lists the altered course in their program/degree requirements.
  • Campus or subject librarians should be consulted to ensure appropriate resources are available to support teaching and research related to course changes.

Course Adds - Suggested Consultation Guidelines

  • Consult all campuses that have a similar department or program and/or are eligible to teach a certain course. For example, if course XYZ 456 is being proposed, then other campuses that teach 400-level XYZ courses should be consulted.
  • For lower-level courses (and specifically general education courses), care should be taken to consult with all of the campuses that have the faculty resources to teach the proposed course. Such courses potentially have a much broader consultation list than specialized, upper-level courses.
  • Consult all departments or programs affected by the addition of NEW prerequisites. For example if course XYZ 456 requires CHEM 112, then the chemistry department should be consulted. This consultation should include every campus that expresses interest in teaching XYZ 456. This is especially important if a proposed course will significantly increase enrollments of a course listed as a prerequisite.
  • For new courses with course titles that may resemble courses outside the proposed course's disciplinary community, consultation should include departments/programs that also use those course titles. For example, suppose a course is proposed with the word "Engineering" in the title that will be taught by a non-engineering department or program. The College of Engineering should be consulted. This is not to imply that programs have ownership of certain words. Rather, caution should be exercised when courses contain words or terms that lie outside the course's home disciplinary community.
  • If a new course is proposed such that the content of the course is at risk of significantly duplicating content offered by another course, the affected department or program should be consulted.
  • Campus or subject librarians should be consulted to ensure appropriate resources are available to support teaching and research related to new courses.

Course Drops - Suggested Consultation Guidelines

  • Consult any campus that has taught this course in the last 5 years.
  • Consult any department or program that requires or lists the course in their program requirements.

Degree Program Adds and Changes - Suggested Consultation Guidelines

  • For program changes (and particularly adds), Administrative Council on Undergraduate Education (ACUE) consultation alone is not sufficient (does not pertain to graduate courses). Although Associate Deans at various departments and campuses are certainly stakeholders, consultation should be conducted at the unit (program or departmental) level at all affected campuses.
  • Consult any campuses that offer the same degree or discipline-similar majors.
  • Consult program representatives regarding any additions to required courses that lie outside of the department or program. This is especially important for small-enrolling, upper-level classes that may experience a significant change in enrollment due to the course addition on the proposed program.
  • Campus or subject librarians should be consulted to ensure appropriate resources are available to support teaching and research related to curriculum additions and changes.

Program Minor Changes or Adds - Suggested Consultation Guidelines

  • Consult any campuses that offer the same minor.
  • Consult program representatives regarding any additions to required courses that lie outside of the department or program. This is especially important for small-enrolling, upper-level classes that may experience a significant change in enrollment due to the course addition in the proposed program.
  • Consult all departments affected by the addition of new prerequisites.
  • Consult with departments/campuses which offer majors that commonly populate the minor. For example, the Engineering Leadership Development minor is largely populated by students in engineering majors; all of those engineering majors should be consulted. This is especially important for "specialization" minors rather than minors with broad appeal (e.g., Psychology, Spanish).
  • Campus or subject librarians should be consulted to ensure appropriate resources are available to support teaching and research related to program additions and changes.

For the most up-to-date curricular information, please refer to the Faculty Senate website.

Curricular Forms