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Penn State Hydrogen Day

Hydrogen Day Summary ~ 2006 / 2004 / 2003

Hydrogen Day is an exciting semi-annual event held by Penn State University complete with posters, display tables, keynote speakers and presentations, numerous guests from the government and industries, laboratory tours, and media coverage. At spirit is showcasing the research, progress, and ideas of researchers from multiple companies, state and federal agencies, and Penn State.

Penn State University has previously held two Hydrogen Energy Days. The first hydrogen day, held on February 5, 2003, occurred one week after President Bush announced a $1.2 billion government initiative to fund hydrogen research and spur a future hydrogen economy. On October 25, 2004, a second Hydrogen Day was facilitated to display the hydrogen fueling station to be constructed on Penn State campus in partnership with Air Products, Penn State, and the Department of Energy.

Both of these events were resounding successes, with a combined total of almost 600 people in attendance. Keynote speakers of these events included Congressman John Peterson (R, fifth district), Secretary of Pennsylvania DEP Kathleen McGinty, and distinguished representatives from numerous companies and scientific research foundations.

Penn State's Hydrogen Day returns this fall on November 14th, 2006, at the Nittany Lion Inn.

The transition to a hydrogen based economy is beginning with the commercial production of hydrogen-based fuel cells. Fuel cells are being produced to power buses, homes, and businesses in the US and in Europe. Several automobile manufacturers are developing automobiles that can convert various mixtures of carbon-based fuels to hydrogen, and oil-based companies have begun to spin off hydrogen-production ventures. The European Union recently announced a new $2 billion dollar program in hydrogen technologies. Some believe that the US currently lags behind Europe in interest, application, and research on alternative energy methods such as fuel cells. That is certainly not true at Penn State University.